A Brief Explanation of the Brahma Chicken
                                                                             By: Annila Bean
 
The Brahma Chicken is a large, but gentle breed of chicken. It is unclear where this particular breed originated from, but people have theorized it was developed in America, by birds with heavily feathered legs, but was imported in the 1840’s by a Chinese port of Shanghai; thus giving the chicken the nickname: “The Shanghai Birds”.
The Brahmas’ name was chosen by the Poultry Judges of Boston, in 1852. It was originally named: Brahmapootra, before the name was then shortened to what we know today: Brahma.
Brahmas’ are good egg-layers. Unlike some chickens, Brahma’s lay their large brown eggs all year-round. They can lay about 150 eggs per year.  The Light and Dark Brahmas’ were included in first “Standard of Perfection” of the “American Poultry Association” in 1874, the Buff Brahma variant was added sometime later; between 1924 and 1929.
The Light Brahmas’ main color is white, with black hackles based in white, and a black tail. The Dark Brahma’s however, have the most notable to tell between the Hens’ and the Cocks: The hens are a dark gray and white coloration, with the hackle being the same color as the light; The cocks’ have black and white hackles and saddle feathers, plus a black base and tail. The Buff variant colors the same pattern of black as the light, but with a golden buff base color instead of white.
The weight average for the Brahmas’ are about: 5.5kg (12 lbs) for cocks, and 4.5kg (9.9lbs) for hens.                         

The Brahma was an important meat bird in America from the 1850s to about 1930


Citations: https://livestockconservancy.org/index.php/heritage/internal/brahma


 " APA Recognized Breeds and Varieties: As of January 1, 2012. American Poultry Association. Archived 4 November 2017.
Liste des races et variétés homologuée dans les pays EE (28.04.2013). Entente Européenne d’Aviculture et de Cuniculture. Archived 16 June 2013.
Breed Classification. Poultry Club of Great Britain. Archived 12 June 2018.
Victoria Roberts (2008). British poultry standards: complete specifications and judging points of all standardized breeds and varieties of poultry as compiled by the specialist breed clubs and recognised by the Poultry Club of Great Britain. Oxford: Blackwell. ISBN 9781405156424.
Brahma Chicken. The Livestock Conservatory. Accessed December 2018.
George Pickering Burnham (1874). The China Fowl: Shanghae, Cochin, and "Brahma". Melrose, Massachusetts: Rand, Avery and Co.
[s.n.] (1954). Breeds of Chickens For Meat and Egg Production. Farmers' Bulletin 2065. Washington, D.C.: United States Department of Agriculture. Pages 14–15.
Cyril Hrnčár, Monika Hässlerová, Jozef Bujko (2013). The Effect of Oviposition Time on Egg Quality Parameters in Brown Leghorn, Oravka and Brahma Hens. Scientific Papers: Animal Science and Biotechnologies 46 (1). "

Citations From wikipedia site used in reasearch

                                                          A Brief Explanation of the:                                                                                                                       

                                                            Plymouth Rock Chicken

                                                                       By: Annila Bean

 

The Plymouth Rock is one of America’s oldest breeds of chicken. It was the most popular breed during World War 2, and was the country’s main source of chicken meat, and its large brown eggs, (It can lay up to 200 of these eggs per year).

 It was first introduced in Boston, in 1849, but then disappeared for about 20 years. It wasn’t until 1869, when Mr. D.A Upham cross-bred a Black Java hen, with a cock that had barred plumage, a single comb, and clean (featherless) legs. The chicken was then added to the Standard of Excellence of the  American Poultry Association in 1874. The chicken was originally bred with barred plumage; the other varieties were added later on.

 There are seven variants of the Plymouth Rock that are recognized by the United States:

1: Buff.

2: White.

3: Blue.

4: Columbian.

5: Partridge.

6: Silver-Penciled.

7: Barred.

However, the most common out of all these breeds are the Barred and White variants.

Plymouth Rocks aren’t known to be very broody. In fact, they’re quite mellow, and tend to be great sitters and moms. Even the roosters have been known to get along with other chickens.

The average weight for the Plymouth Rocks are:

7 ½ lbs for Hens.

9 ½ lbs for Cocks.

 

Citations:

https://www.thehappychickencoop.com/plymouth-rock-chicken



Victoria Roberts (2008). British poultry standards: complete specifications and judging points of all standardized breeds and varieties of poultry as compiled by the specialist breed clubs and recognised by the Poultry Club of Great Britain. Oxford: Blackwell. ISBN 9781405156424.
Plymouth Rock Chicken The Livestock Conservancy. Archived 10 October 2016.
APA Recognized Breeds and Varieties: As of January 1, 2012. American Poultry Association. Archived 4 November 2017.
Liste des races et variétés homologuée dans les pays EE (28.04.2013). Entente Européenne d’Aviculture et de Cuniculture. Archived 16 June 2013.
Breed Classification. Poultry Club of Great Britain. Archived 12 June 2018.
Carol Ekarius (2007). Storey's Illustrated Guide to Poultry Breeds. North Adams, Massachusetts: Storey Publishing. ISBN 9781580176675.
Transboundary breed: Plymouth Rock. Domestic Animal Diversity Information System of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Accessed October 2016.
Transboundary breed: Plymouth Rock Barred. Domestic Animal Diversity Information System of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Accessed October 2016.
Transboundary breed: Plymouth Rock White. Domestic Animal Diversity Information System of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Accessed October 2016.
Janet Vorwald Dohner (2001). The Encyclopedia of Historic and Endangered Livestock and Poultry Breeds. New Haven, Connecticut; London: Yale University Press. ISBN 0300088809.
James Bishop (1998). Australian Poultry Standard, first edition. Linton, Victoria: Victorian Poultry Fanciers' Association. ISBN 9780646362311.
Peter Hric, Cyril Hrnčár, Jozef Bujko (2012). Diversity in Population Size and Production Parameters of Selected Varieties of Plymouth Rock Chicken Breed. Scientific Papers Animal Science and Biotechnologies 45 (1): 189–192. ISSN 2344-4576.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plymouth_Rock_chicken  (article used citations above taken from)